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This Website Terms of Use

THIS DOCUMENT CONTAINS IMPORTANT TERMS AND CONDITIONS THAT AFFECT YOUR LEGAL RIGHTS AND REMEDIES. YOUR USE OF THIS WEBSITE CONSTITUTES ACCEPTANCE OF THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS PhotosNorth and/or its related subsidiaries, and affiliates, (collectively "PhotosNorth"), provide this website and its services to you subject to the following terms and conditions, which may be changed without notice by PhotosNorth. In these "Terms and Conditions", the words "us", "we", and "our" refer to PhotosNorth.

DISCLAIMER

This website and all information, photographs, pictures, images, artwork, text, and other materials contained on this website, and the website construction, content and presentation, (collectively, the "Information") is provided "AS IS". PhotosNorth makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, as to the operation of this website, its services, or the Information. The accuracy and completeness of any Information provided by third parties is the responsibility of, and entirely under the control of, those third parties. Photosnorth is not responsible for any damages of any kind, including but not limited to direct, indirect, special, consequential or incidental damages in any way arising out of your use of this website, its services or the information, including any damages you may suffer as a result of your personal information being transmitted between you and Photosnorth. We are not responsible for lost, incomplete, illegible, misdirected or stolen messages or mail, unavailable connections, failed, incomplete, garbled or delayed transmissions, online failures, hardware, software or other technical malfunctions or disturbances. to the full extent permissible by applicable law, Photosnorth disclaims all warranties, express or implied, including but not limited to implied warranties or conditions of merchantable quality, fitness for a particular purpose, title, and non-infringement.

EXCLUSION OF LIABILITY

Photosnorth will not be liable to any party for any damages of any kind including but not limited to direct, indirect, special or other consequential or incidental damages, lost profits, business interruption or otherwise, arising directly or indirectly from the use of this website or Photosnorth's services, even if such damages are foreseeable or Photosnorth is expressly advised of the possibility of such damages and regardless of the basis on which a claim for damages is made.

INFORMATION While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the information is accurate and reliable when it was posted on this site, the information may not be accurate, complete or current. You use the Information at your own risk and you should not rely on the Information in situations where that reliance might result in any loss or damage to persons or property.

COPYRIGHT

The Information is protected by Canadian and International copyright laws. All Information available on this site is intended for private, non-commercial use by individuals. Any commercial use of the Information, in whole or in part, directly or indirectly, without the prior written consent of the owner(s) of the copyright, is specifically prohibited. The Information may not be modified or altered in any respect, merged with other data or published in any form, in whole or in part. Individual users may, subject to these terms and conditions, print or save individual pages for private, non-commercial use, however, an individual user may not otherwise copy, reproduce, republish, post, transmit, display, perform, distribute, modify or create derivative works from the Information without prior consent from PhotosNorth.

PRIVACY

PhotosNorth respects your personal privacy. You may use this website without providing any personal information about yourself to us. Except as may otherwise be set out in our privacy policies, we will not collect, use, or disclose your personal information without your consent. If we ask you to provide us with any personal information, we will tell you the purposes for which we intend to use that information and we will not use or disclose that information for any other purposes without your consent. Our advertisers and sponsors may utilize cookies. Cookies are small pieces of data which are stored on your computer to allow your web browser to remember sites that have been visited. However, unless you choose to identify yourself to PhotosNorth, you remain anonymous to us. Unless otherwise communicated to you at the time, you may set your computer to not accept cookies while browsing our site without negatively affecting your use of our site.

COOKIES

This website runs ads provided by Google, Commission Junction, Linkshare, Connect Commerce and Amazon.com. Relevant information regarding these services is as follows:

What are cookies?

A “cookie” is a small text file containing a string of alphanumeric characters. There are two types of cookies: a persistent cookie and a session cookie. A persistent cookie gets entered by your Web browser into the cookie folder on your computer’s hard drive. A persistent cookie remains in that cookie folder, which is maintained and governed by your Web browser, after you close your browser program. A session cookie is temporary and disappears after you close your browser. DoubleClick’s ad-serving and paid search listing (“DART Search”) products utilize the same cookie: the DART cookie. The DART cookie is a persistent cookie and consists of the name of the domain that set the cookie (“ad.doubleclick.net”), the lifetime of the cookie, and a “value.” DoubleClick’s DART technology generates a unique series of characters for the “value” portion of the cookie.

What is the DoubleClick cookie doing on my computer?

If you have a DoubleClick cookie in your Cookies folder, it is most likely a DART cookie. The DoubleClick DART cookie helps marketers learn how well their Internet advertising campaigns or paid search listings perform. Many marketers and Internet websites use DoubleClick’s DART technology to deliver and serve their advertisements or manage their paid search listings. DoubleClick’s DART products set or recognize a unique, persistent cookie when an ad is displayed or a paid listing is selected. The information that the DART cookie helps to give marketers includes the number of unique users their advertisements were displayed to, how many users clicked on their Internet ads or paid listings, and which ads or paid listings they clicked on.

Why does your cookie keep coming back after I delete it?

When you visit any website or search engine on which DoubleClick’s DART technology is used, our servers will check to see if you already have a DART cookie. If the servers do not receive a DART cookie, the servers will try to set a cookie in response to your browser’s “request” to view that Web page. If you do not want a DART cookie with a unique value, you can obtain a DoubleClick DART “opt out” cookie. Alternatively, you can adjust your Internet browser’s settings for handling cookies. This is explained in the next question.

How can I adjust my cookie settings to accept or decline cookies?

To eliminate cookies you may have currently accepted, and to deny or limit cookies in the future, please follow one of these procedures:

IMPORTANT: IF YOU DELETE YOUR OPT-OUT COOKIE, YOU WILL NEED TO OPT-OUT AGAIN. IF YOUR BROWSER BLOCKS ALL OR THIRD-PARTY COOKIES, YOU WILL BLOCK THE SETTING OF OPT-OUT COOKIES.

  • If you are using Internet Explorer 6.0, go to the Tools menu, then to Internet Options, then to the Privacy tab. This version of Internet Explorer is the first to use P3P to distinguish between types of cookies. P3P uses standardized privacy statements made by the cookie issuer to manage your acceptance of cookies. Under the “Privacy” tab, click on the “Advanced” button. Select “Override automatic cookie handling” and choose whether you want to accept, block or be prompted for “First-party” and “Third-party Cookies.” If you want to block all cookies coming from DoubleClick’s doubleclick.net domain, go to the “Web Sites” section under the “Privacy” tab and click the “Edit” button. In the “Address of Web site” field, enter “doubleclick.net,” select “Block,” click OK (menu will disappear); click OK again and you will be back to the browser.
  • If you are using Netscape 6.0+, go to “Edit” in the menu bar, click on “Preferences,” click on “Advanced,” and select the “Cookies” field. Now check either the box that says, “Warn me before accepting a cookie” or “Disable cookies.” Click on “OK.” Now go to your “Start” button, click on “Find,” click on “Files and Folders,” type “cookies.txt” into the search box that appears, and click “Find Now.” When the search results appear, drag all files listed, into the “Recycle Bin.” Now shut down and restart your Netscape. Depending on your earlier choice you will either be prompted by new cookie sets or no cookies will be set or received.
  • If you are using Mozilla or Safari, please go to their websites to find out how to disable cookies in those programs.

What are Web beacons?

Web beacons are small strings of HTML code that are placed in a Web page. They are sometimes called “clear GIFs” (Graphics Interchange Format) or “pixel tags.” Web beacons are most often used in conjunction with cookies. DoubleClick uses Web beacons in connection with its products and services, including ad serving and paid search listings (“DART Search”). Because a Web beacon is only 1 pixel high by 1 pixel wide, it appears invisible on your computer screen. If Web beacons were made larger (e.g., 100 pixels high by 100 pixels wide), it would take much longer for your Web page to load and would clutter up the page that you have requested.

In 2002, working with a broad spectrum of companies, including other technology companies, seal providers and websites, DoubleClick helped draft “Best Practice” guidelines for disclosing the use of Web beacons. Please click here to see these guidelines – and a list of the companies that participated in developing them.

What is “personally identifiable information” (“PII")?

“Personally identifiable information” is any information that can identify or locate a particular person, including but not limited to name, address, telephone number, email address, social security number, bank account number or credit card number.

What is “non personally identifiable information” (“non-PII”)?

“Non-personally identifiable information” is information that cannot identify a particular person. This type of information includes a user’s Internet Service Provider, a computer’s operating system and browser type, and a unique DoubleClick DART cookie ID.

DoubleClick’s ad-serving and search products utilize non-PII. Some of our clients may associate PII that you have given them (for example, a customer number, if you have registered at or purchased from their websites), with their advertising campaigns. Although this customer number may be passed from the client to DoubleClick’s ad servers during the ad delivery process, DoubleClick cannot recognize this information as PII and cannot link it to any person.

What is “sensitive information?”

To DoubleClick, “sensitive information” categorically includes but is not limited to data related to an individual's health or medical condition, sexual behavior or orientation, or detailed personal finances, information that appears to relate to children under the age of 13 at the time of data collection; and PII otherwise protected under federal or state law (for example, cable subscriber information or video rental records). DoubleClick does not use any “sensitive information” to target Internet advertisements.

What is ad serving?

In order to support their content without charging visitors, websites sell advertising space on their Web pages. Companies like DoubleClick provide technology for the websites and advertisers to use to display ads on the websites. DoubleClick’s ad servers work at the direction – and on behalf – of our clients.

When you visit a website, your computer’s Internet browser transmits a “request” to that website’s server, “asking” that server to send you the Web page that you are seeking. Most Web pages contain components that are pulled from different sources. For example, a Web page at a news site may get its weather section from one provider, its sports results from a different source, and advertisements from other servers.

If the website is using DoubleClick’s technology to display ads on its site, the Web page will contain coding that directs your browser to fill the ad space on the Web page with content from one of DoubleClick’s ad servers. DoubleClick’s clients select the format, content, and location of the ads, as well as the criteria for controlling which ads to show and when to show them. DoubleClick’s ad-serving technology uses a cookie to help clients determine what ads to display. When a “call” is received by DoubleClick’s ad servers, the server checks to see if the “calling” browser has sent a cookie with the request for advertising. If the server doesn’t “see” either a unique DoubleClick cookie or an opt-out cookie, after “testing” to see whether the browser will accept cookies, the server sets a unique DoubleClick ad cookie. If the browser already has a unique DoubleClick ad cookie, the server “recognizes” the cookie and uses the unique ID for targeting and reporting purposes as specified by the DoubleClick client. If the browser has an opt-out DoubleClick cookie, the server uses only the non-cookie related information that is automatically transmitted in the Internet environment (e.g., browser type, Internet service provider, and information about the general content of the site or page displayed on your browser) to determine which ad to show. Sometimes Web beacons are used in conjunction with the DART cookie when clients want more versatile targeting or reporting capabilities.

How does an ad-serving client use DoubleClick’s technology to target or select which ad to deliver?

Our clients store their ads on DoubleClick’s ad servers. When you visit a Web page on which a client is using DoubleClick technology to deliver ads, coding that the website publisher placed in the Web page tells your computer’s browser to send a request for an ad to the DoubleClick ad server. When the DoubleClick ad server receives a request, it will select an ad based on the criteria that the client has chosen together with any information logged against the unique cookie id.

For example, a client’s website may attract an audience of mainly men, aged between 18 and 45, who are interested in sports, fashion and electronic gadgets. The client will therefore approach sports, fashion and electronic gadget retailers to see if they would like to advertise on the site. Those retailers will provide the client with ads, which the client will store on the DoubleClick ad servers. The client will assign those ads specific codes, such as sports = 1, fashion = 2, and electronic gadgets = 3. On the pages where the website publisher wants to show all three categories of ads, the website will install an ad tag that contains all three codes. On pages of the website that the client thinks attracts only men interested in sports, an ad tag that contains only the code for sports, code 1, may be installed.

DoubleClick does not tell clients which criteria to select or which advertisements to target against those criteria. Clients choose the categories they wish to attach to the advertising that they have contracted to show, what code(s) they wish to attach to those categories, and which code(s) they wish to include in each of their ad request tags. In their contracts with DoubleClick, DoubleClick’s ad-serving clients promise not to use information that DoubleClick could recognize as either “sensitive” or “personally identifiable” to target ads.

What information is collected by a client using DoubleClick’s ad serving technology?

Each time one of DoubleClick's ad servers receives a request for an ad or for a Web beacon, information about the request received and the ad or Web beacon served – for example, the date, the time, the website to which the ad or image was delivered, the cookie ID to which the ad was shown, the operating system which the browser was using – will be recorded.

Does DoubleClick itself do anything with this ad-serving information?

No. The information that is recorded on the DoubleClick servers by our clients’ use of our technology belongs to our clients. Although that information may be logged on a DoubleClick server, DoubleClick's relationship with the client is that of an agent or processor. Consequently, DoubleClick does not own that information and cannot, therefore, use that information for its own business purposes or in any way not authorized by the relevant client. DoubleClick clients do, however, give us permission to use statistical or aggregate information derived from their use of the technology – e.g., statistics about the number of ads served through the technology per month or analyses about, for example, what time of day is the best time to target certain types of ads.

Does DoubleClick sell the ad serving information to other companies?

No. The data that DoubleClick’s servers record during ad serving belong to DoubleClick’s clients, and DoubleClick cannot and does not sell that information to other companies. DoubleClick can, however, use its aggregate analyses about the effectiveness of ad campaigns to help clients develop more efficient and successful campaigns.

What are pop-ups and why do I see pop up advertising?

A pop-up is basically the opening of a new window in your browser.

DoubleClick provides its ad-serving clients with a means of choosing and reporting on ads. It is the website owners or the advertisers with whom they contract that make the decisions about the format of the ads. The advertisers choose whether they want to have banner ads or pop ups delivered, and they use our technology to make it happen. The website owners and advertisers choose the size and frequency of pop-up ads. DoubleClick has no control over which ad format website publishers or their advertisers choose.

Generally, there are a couple of different ways that you might receive pop up advertising:

  1. The site you are currently visiting has sold an advertising opportunity to a marketer and that marketer has chosen to create an advertisement that opens a new browser window. This is a form of “traditional” Internet advertising.
  2. You have some kind of ad-delivery software installed (intentionally or unintentionally, knowingly or unknowingly) on your computer. This type of software often comes bundled with freeware such as P2P (Peer-to-Peer) music sharing applications. It may track the sites you visit and scan their contents looking for triggers that match criteria identified by advertisers that purchased space from the software manufacturer. The software program will then display advertisements on your monitor.

What is spyware?

This term has been applied to a very broad range of technologies and activities -- from the mere setting of a cookie to the surreptitious installation of key-logging software on consumers’ computers. There are many anti-spyware programs on the market and they each have their own definition of “spyware”. For example, some programs identify cookies as “spyware”, while others do not. Some software programs that monitor the websites that consumers visit in order to deliver context-based advertisements have been categorized as “adware.” Many of these adware programs are responsible for the pop-up advertisements that you see.

DoubleClick does not consider its products either “spyware” or “adware.” We believe that consumers should be provided meaningful notice and choice with respect to information collected and used about them.

 

What vendors are certified for third-party ads?

Print

The following third parties are supported:

North America: Ad servers

North America: Rich media

North America: Research

EMEA: Ad servers

EMEA: Rich media

EMEA: Research

All vendors must complete a certification process. At its sole discretion, Google reserves the right to change this vendor list at any time.

You can out opt at: http://www.networkadvertising.org/managing/opt_out.asp.

Because publisher sites and laws across countries vary, we're unable to suggest specific privacy policy language. You may wish to review resources such as the Network Advertising Initiative (NAI), which suggests the following language for data collection of non-personally identifying information:

'We use third-party advertising companies to serve ads when you visit our website. These companies may use information (not including your name, address, email address, or telephone number) about your visits to this and other websites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services of interest to you. If you would like more information about this practice and to know your choices about not having this information used by these companies, click here.'

You can find additional information in Appendix A of the NAI Self-Regulatory principles for publishers (PDF). Please note that the Network Advertising Initiative may change this sample language at any time.

LINKING

Any sites that are linked from this website are not under our control, and PhotosNorth does not assume any responsibility or liability for any communications or materials available at those linked sites. However, you access linked sites at your own risk. If you wish to provide a link to our website from your website, you may only link to our home page at http://www.photosnorth.ca. You may not use any of PhotosNorth's banners, symbols or logos without the express written consent of PhotosNorth, and you may not use the link to suggest that PhotosNorth sponsors, endorses, approves of or is affiliated with your website.

JURISDICTION

The laws in force in Alberta, Canada will govern these disclaimers, terms, and conditions.

October 25, 2009